Wading Through the Stereotypes: Positive and Negative Associations between Media Use and Black Adolescents' Conceptions of Self

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Abstract

Although concern is often expressed that frequent media exposure may adversely affect the self-esteem and racial self-esteem of African American youths, evidence to support this assumption has been limited. To examine this issue, the author collected data among 156 African American high school students, testing connections among racial self-esteem, three dimensions of self-esteem, and multiple forms of media use. Whereas initial comparisons revealed media use to be a negative correlate of self-esteem, further analysis demonstrated that this association varied depending on the media genre and the domain of self in question, the content of students' media diets, and the individual characteristics of the viewer. In addition, both stronger identification with popular Black characters and greater religiosity emerged as possible protective factors.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages284-294
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

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Ego
Self Concept
self-esteem
stereotype
adolescent
African Americans
Students
genre
student
Diet
school
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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