Resident training in female sexual dysfunction: A comparison of urology and obstetrics and gynecology programs

Kristina A. Jacob, Jason Bell, Sean Francis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Objective: The study's objective was to develop a tool that would characterize and compare resident training in female sexual dysfunction (FSD). Methods: A questionnaire was designed. Internet distribution targeted program directors of accredited urology and obstetrics and gynecology programs (N = 351). Results: Sixty-nine percent of programs did not have a standard protocol for working up patients with FSD, and 51% "rarely or never" have a faculty member with special training. Most (79%) agreed that resident training needed improvement. Barriers included lack of expert faculty, time, and resources. Obstetrics and gynecology program directors were more likely to agree with national training guidelines that promote FSD and more often encouraged residents to screen for FSD (63% vs 24%). Conclusions: Obstetrics and gynecology programs advocate FSD training more so than urology; however, both acknowledge its importance and the need for educational development.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages238-241
Number of pages4
JournalFemale Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Urology
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Internet
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Gynecology
  • Residency training
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Urology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Resident training in female sexual dysfunction : A comparison of urology and obstetrics and gynecology programs. / Jacob, Kristina A.; Bell, Jason; Francis, Sean.

In: Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 17, No. 5, 2011, p. 238-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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