Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients

B. J. Carroll, J. F. Greden, M. Feinberg, N. Lohr, N. M. James, M. Steiner, R. F. Haskett, A. A. Albala, J. P. DeVigne, J. Tarika

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Abstract

There is a significant group of patients who have melancholic episodes superimposed on a chronic borderline character disorder. When this occurs the clinical gestalt is often atypical for classical melancholia. Reliable diagnoses can be very difficult to obtain in such patients. Many of these patients have abnormal results on the dexamethasone suppression test; shortened REM latency has also been reported, as well as strong family history of affective disorder. Thus, the dexamethasone suppression test may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these complicated patients who constitute a special clinical variant of melancholia. Finally, we emphasize that identifying a superimposed endogenous depression will not necessarily make the management of such patients a great deal more simple. They will continue to be difficult patients, ambivalent, noncompliant, and frustrating to engage in treatment. By being aware of the two interacting disorders, however, the clinician will be in a more rational position to use both drugs and psychotherapy, and to keep the two issues separate in evaluating the outcome.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages89-99
Number of pages11
JournalPsychiatric Clinics of North America
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1981

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Depression
Depressive Disorder
Dexamethasone
Mood Disorders
Psychotherapy
Differential Diagnosis
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Carroll, B. J., Greden, J. F., Feinberg, M., Lohr, N., James, N. M., Steiner, M., ... Tarika, J. (1981). Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 4(1), 89-99.

Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients. / Carroll, B. J.; Greden, J. F.; Feinberg, M.; Lohr, N.; James, N. M.; Steiner, M.; Haskett, R. F.; Albala, A. A.; DeVigne, J. P.; Tarika, J.

In: Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1981, p. 89-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carroll, BJ, Greden, JF, Feinberg, M, Lohr, N, James, NM, Steiner, M, Haskett, RF, Albala, AA, DeVigne, JP & Tarika, J 1981, 'Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients' Psychiatric Clinics of North America, vol 4, no. 1, pp. 89-99.
Carroll BJ, Greden JF, Feinberg M, Lohr N, James NM, Steiner M et al. Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients. Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 1981;4(1):89-99.
Carroll, B. J. ; Greden, J. F. ; Feinberg, M. ; Lohr, N. ; James, N. M. ; Steiner, M. ; Haskett, R. F. ; Albala, A. A. ; DeVigne, J. P. ; Tarika, J./ Neuroendocrine evaluation of depression in borderline patients. In: Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 1981 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 89-99
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