Motion Artifact Suppression in Impedance Pneumography Signal for Portable Monitoring of Respiration: An Adaptive Approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The focus of this paper is motion artifact (MA) reduction from the impedance pneumography (IP) signal, which is widely used to monitor respiration. The amplitude of the MA that contaminates the IP signal is often much larger than the amplitude of the respiratory component of the signal. Moreover, the morphology and frequency composition of the artifacts may be very similar to that of the respiration, making it difficult to remove these artifacts. The proposed filter uses a regularization term to ensure that the pattern of the filtered signal is similar to that of respiration. It also ensures that the amplitude of the filter output is within the expected range of the IP signal by imposing an -tube on the filtered signal. The adaptive -tube filter is 100 times faster than the previously proposed nonadaptive version and achieves higher accuracies. Moreover, the experimental results, using several different performance measures, suggest that the proposed method outperforms popular MA reduction methods such as normalized least mean squares (NLMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) as well as independent component analysis (ICA). When used to extract the respiratory rate, the adaptive -tube achieves a mean error of 1.27 breaths per minute (BPM) compared to 4.72 and 4.63 BPM for the NLMS and RLS filters, respectively. When compared to the ICA algorithm, the proposed filter has an error of 1.06 BPM compared to 3.47 BPM for ICA. The statistical analyses indicate that all of the reported performance improvements are significant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7397827
Pages (from-to)387-398
Number of pages12
JournalIEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Electric Impedance
Artifacts
Respiration
Independent component analysis
Least-Squares Analysis
Monitoring
Chemical analysis
Respiratory Rate

Keywords

  • Epsilon-tube
  • Impedance pneumography (IP)
  • Motion artifact (MA)
  • Portable and in-home monitoring
  • Respiration monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Information Management
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Motion Artifact Suppression in Impedance Pneumography Signal for Portable Monitoring of Respiration: An Adaptive Approach",
abstract = "The focus of this paper is motion artifact (MA) reduction from the impedance pneumography (IP) signal, which is widely used to monitor respiration. The amplitude of the MA that contaminates the IP signal is often much larger than the amplitude of the respiratory component of the signal. Moreover, the morphology and frequency composition of the artifacts may be very similar to that of the respiration, making it difficult to remove these artifacts. The proposed filter uses a regularization term to ensure that the pattern of the filtered signal is similar to that of respiration. It also ensures that the amplitude of the filter output is within the expected range of the IP signal by imposing an -tube on the filtered signal. The adaptive -tube filter is 100 times faster than the previously proposed nonadaptive version and achieves higher accuracies. Moreover, the experimental results, using several different performance measures, suggest that the proposed method outperforms popular MA reduction methods such as normalized least mean squares (NLMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) as well as independent component analysis (ICA). When used to extract the respiratory rate, the adaptive -tube achieves a mean error of 1.27 breaths per minute (BPM) compared to 4.72 and 4.63 BPM for the NLMS and RLS filters, respectively. When compared to the ICA algorithm, the proposed filter has an error of 1.06 BPM compared to 3.47 BPM for ICA. The statistical analyses indicate that all of the reported performance improvements are significant.",
keywords = "Epsilon-tube, Impedance pneumography (IP), Motion artifact (MA), Portable and in-home monitoring, Respiration monitoring",
author = "Sardar Ansari and Ward, {Kevin R.} and Kayvan Najarian",
year = "2017",
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AB - The focus of this paper is motion artifact (MA) reduction from the impedance pneumography (IP) signal, which is widely used to monitor respiration. The amplitude of the MA that contaminates the IP signal is often much larger than the amplitude of the respiratory component of the signal. Moreover, the morphology and frequency composition of the artifacts may be very similar to that of the respiration, making it difficult to remove these artifacts. The proposed filter uses a regularization term to ensure that the pattern of the filtered signal is similar to that of respiration. It also ensures that the amplitude of the filter output is within the expected range of the IP signal by imposing an -tube on the filtered signal. The adaptive -tube filter is 100 times faster than the previously proposed nonadaptive version and achieves higher accuracies. Moreover, the experimental results, using several different performance measures, suggest that the proposed method outperforms popular MA reduction methods such as normalized least mean squares (NLMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) as well as independent component analysis (ICA). When used to extract the respiratory rate, the adaptive -tube achieves a mean error of 1.27 breaths per minute (BPM) compared to 4.72 and 4.63 BPM for the NLMS and RLS filters, respectively. When compared to the ICA algorithm, the proposed filter has an error of 1.06 BPM compared to 3.47 BPM for ICA. The statistical analyses indicate that all of the reported performance improvements are significant.

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