"Keepin'it real": Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction

Research output: ResearchChapter

Abstract

Urban fiction-also known as gangsta lit, street lit, ghetto fiction, and hip-hop fiction-has taken the US. publishing world by storm. Bearing titles such as Thugs and the Women Who Love Them and Forever a Hustler's Wife, urban books feature African Americans who are involved in urban street crime, including drug dealing, hustling, prostitution, and murder. The genre has gained immense popularity, particularly among young black women, since the 1999 publication of Sister Souljah's best-selling novel The Coldest Winter Ever. Its roots extend further back, however, to African American novels about ghetto life such as Iceberg Slims Pimp: The Story of My Life (1969) and Donald Goines's Whoreson: The Story of a Ghetto Pimp (1972). Although urban fiction writers struggled to find publishers for their work in the late 1990s, some authors now sign six-figure contracts with major publishing houses, and urban books dominate the African American collections in large chain bookstores.1.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFrom Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
PublisherUniversity of Massachusetts Press
Pages124-141
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)9781558499522
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

African Americans
Fiction
Ghetto
Drugs
Cold
American Novels
Wives
Prostitution
Winter
1990s
Hip-hop
Thugs
Crime
Murder
Writer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Sweeney, M. (2012). "Keepin'it real": Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction. In From Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century (pp. 124-141). University of Massachusetts Press.

"Keepin'it real" : Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction. / Sweeney, Megan.

From Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. University of Massachusetts Press, 2012. p. 124-141.

Research output: ResearchChapter

Sweeney, M 2012, "Keepin'it real": Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction. in From Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 124-141.
Sweeney M. "Keepin'it real": Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction. In From Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. University of Massachusetts Press. 2012. p. 124-141.
Sweeney, Megan. / "Keepin'it real" : Incarcerated womens readings of African American Urban fiction. From Codex to Hypertext: Reading at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. University of Massachusetts Press, 2012. pp. 124-141
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