Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics

Steve B. White, Nidia C. Gallego, Daniel D. Johnson, Kevin Pipe, Albert J. Shih, Edward Jih

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

  • 8 Citations

Abstract

Hybrid and fuel cell vehicles utilize the Si-based IGBT (Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistor) controller which must dissipate about 100 W/cm 2 heat and maintain a temperature below 125°C. The application of porous, high thermal conductivity carbon foam, a new class of advanced lightweight material, to the thermal management of this electronic system and the use of micro- and nano-scale thermal measurement methods for analyzing thermal transport in electronics are presented. Development of advanced carbon foam with different pore structure by variation of the foaming pressure is discussed. The use of carbon foam to remove the heat generated in power electronics has been studied in three approaches: 1) forced air convection, 2) water cooled heat exchanger, and 3) evaporative cooling.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004
Pages61-65
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2004
Event8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET - Novi, MI, United States
Duration: Oct 21 2004Oct 22 2004

Other

Other8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET
CountryUnited States
CityNovi, MI
Period10/21/0410/22/04

Fingerprint

Power electronics
heat
Foams
Graphite
electronics
Cooling
Carbon
measurement method
Bipolar transistors
Pore structure
air
Temperature control
Heat exchangers
Fuel cells
Thermal conductivity
water
Electronic equipment
management
Controllers
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transportation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

White, S. B., Gallego, N. C., Johnson, D. D., Pipe, K., Shih, A. J., & Jih, E. (2004). Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics. In 8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004 (pp. 61-65)

Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics. / White, Steve B.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Johnson, Daniel D.; Pipe, Kevin; Shih, Albert J.; Jih, Edward.

8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004. 2004. p. 61-65.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

White, SB, Gallego, NC, Johnson, DD, Pipe, K, Shih, AJ & Jih, E 2004, Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics. in 8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004. pp. 61-65, 8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET, Novi, MI, United States, 10/21/04.
White SB, Gallego NC, Johnson DD, Pipe K, Shih AJ, Jih E. Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics. In 8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004. 2004. p. 61-65.
White, Steve B. ; Gallego, Nidia C. ; Johnson, Daniel D. ; Pipe, Kevin ; Shih, Albert J. ; Jih, Edward. / Graphite foam for cooling of automotive power electronics. 8th IEEE Workshop on Power Electronics in Transportation, WPET 2004. 2004. pp. 61-65
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