Good intentions gone wrong: Did conservation management threaten Endangered huemul deer Hippocamelus bisulcus in the future Patagonia National Park?

Heiko U. Wittmer, L. Mark Elbroch, Andrew J. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 8 Citations

Abstract

Abstract Conservation interventions increasingly involve active management of relative species abundances, especially when taxa of conservation concern are threatened by complex food web interactions. Unfortunately, the complexity of such interspecific interactions means that well-meaning management interventions can have unexpected, sometimes detrimental, effects on the species they are intended to protect. Here we report that the abrupt removal of an abundant non-native prey species (domestic sheep) and the cessation of predator control, actions intended to protect huemul deer Hippocamelus bisulcus in the future Patagonia National Park, appear to have had negative effects on this Endangered ungulate. During and following the changes in predator-prey management, predation of huemul fawns and females older than 1 year by native culpeo foxes Lycalopex culpaeus and pumas Puma concolor increased 3- and 5-fold, respectively. Predictions from demographic models suggest that elevated mortality rates of female huemul older than 1 year will, on average, cause this population of huemul to decline. These results highlight risks of unintended consequences when aggressive management actions are taken to protect taxa embedded in complex food webs. They also suggest that careful consideration of both inter- and intra-trophic level effects among all species in a system is warranted before conservation interventions are undertaken.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-402
Number of pages10
JournalOryx
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

deer
food web
national park
food webs
national parks
Argentina
domestic species
predator control
interspecific interaction
conservation management
ungulate
sheep
trophic level
predation
predator
fold
mortality
prediction
Puma
Puma concolor

Keywords

  • Food web interactions
  • guanaco
  • Hippocamelus bisulcus
  • huemul
  • Lama guanicoe
  • Patagonia National Park
  • predation
  • Puma concolor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Good intentions gone wrong : Did conservation management threaten Endangered huemul deer Hippocamelus bisulcus in the future Patagonia National Park? / Wittmer, Heiko U.; Elbroch, L. Mark; Marshall, Andrew J.

In: Oryx, Vol. 47, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 393-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wittmer, Heiko U.; Elbroch, L. Mark; Marshall, Andrew J. / Good intentions gone wrong : Did conservation management threaten Endangered huemul deer Hippocamelus bisulcus in the future Patagonia National Park?

In: Oryx, Vol. 47, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 393-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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