Election night's alright for fighting: The role of emotions in political participation

Nicholas A. Valentino, Ted Brader, Eric W. Groenendyk, Krysha Gregorowicz, Vincent L. Hutchings

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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Abstract

A large literature has established a persistent association between the skills and resources citizens possess and their likelihood of participating in politics. However, the short-term motivational forces that cause citizens to employ those skills and expend resources in one election but not the next have only recently received attention. Findings in political psychology suggest specific emotions may play an important role in mobilization, but the question of 'which emotions play what role'? remains an important area of debate. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theory and the Affective Intelligence model, we predict that anger, more than anxiety or enthusiasm, will mobilize. We find evidence for the distinctive influence of anger in a randomized experiment, a national survey of the 2008 electorate, and in pooled American National Election Studies from 1980 to 2004.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages156-170
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Politics
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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political participation
anger
emotion
election
citizen
resources
political psychology
election research
role play
mobilization
intelligence
anxiety
cause
politics
experiment
evidence
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Election night's alright for fighting : The role of emotions in political participation. / Valentino, Nicholas A.; Brader, Ted; Groenendyk, Eric W.; Gregorowicz, Krysha; Hutchings, Vincent L.

In: Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 156-170.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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