Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles

Jingwen Hu, Nichole Ritchie Orton, Rebekah Gruber, Ryan Hoover, Kevin Tribbett, Jonathan Rupp, Dave Clark, Risa Scherer, Matthew Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Among all the vehicle rollover test procedures, the SAE J2114 dolly rollover test is the most widely used. However, it requires the test vehicle to be seated on a dolly with a 23° initial angle, which makes it difficult to test a vehicle over 5,000 kg without a dolly design change, and repeatability is often a concern. In the current study, we developed and implemented a new dynamic rollover test methodology that can be used for evaluating crashworthiness and occupant protection without requiring an initial vehicle angle. To do that, a custom cart was designed to carry the test vehicle laterally down a track. The cart incorporates two ramps under the testing vehicle's trailing-side tires. In a test, the cart with the vehicle travels at the desired test speed and is stopped by a track-mounted curb. While the cart is being stopped by two honeycomb blocks, the vehicle slides laterally from the cart with the far-side wheels sliding up the ramps, which generates the desired lateral roll rate. The vehicle near-side wheels slide onto a high-friction surface, which generates an additional strong roll moment around the vehicle center of gravity. To design the testing procedure, computational simulations were conducted to select values for several testing parameters, including ramp height, ramp length, ground surface friction, vehicle traveling speed, cart height and stopping distance to ensure desired roll rate and number of quarter turns. Three physical tests using three armored military vehicles were conducted using the procedure. All tests resulted in the desired 5 to 8 quarter-turns of the vehicle, and the instrumented tests showed repeatable initial roll rates. The tests demonstrated that the newly-designed rollover procedure is suitable for vehicles that are generally too large/heavy for other dynamic rollover methods, and may also be useful for lighter vehicles when a well-controlled, directly lateral roll is desired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSAE Technical Papers
Volume2017-March
Issue numberMarch
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2017

Fingerprint

Testing
Wheels
Friction
Armored vehicles
Military vehicles
Curbs
Crashworthiness
Tires
Gravitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Hu, J., Ritchie Orton, N., Gruber, R., Hoover, R., Tribbett, K., Rupp, J., ... Reed, M. (2017). Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles. SAE Technical Papers, 2017-March(March). DOI: 10.4271/2017-01-1457

Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles. / Hu, Jingwen; Ritchie Orton, Nichole; Gruber, Rebekah; Hoover, Ryan; Tribbett, Kevin; Rupp, Jonathan; Clark, Dave; Scherer, Risa; Reed, Matthew.

In: SAE Technical Papers, Vol. 2017-March, No. March, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, J, Ritchie Orton, N, Gruber, R, Hoover, R, Tribbett, K, Rupp, J, Clark, D, Scherer, R & Reed, M 2017, 'Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles' SAE Technical Papers, vol 2017-March, no. March. DOI: 10.4271/2017-01-1457
Hu J, Ritchie Orton N, Gruber R, Hoover R, Tribbett K, Rupp J et al. Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles. SAE Technical Papers. 2017 Mar 28;2017-March(March). Available from, DOI: 10.4271/2017-01-1457

Hu, Jingwen; Ritchie Orton, Nichole; Gruber, Rebekah; Hoover, Ryan; Tribbett, Kevin; Rupp, Jonathan; Clark, Dave; Scherer, Risa; Reed, Matthew / Development of A New Dynamic Rollover Test Methodology for Heavy Vehicles.

In: SAE Technical Papers, Vol. 2017-March, No. March, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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