Can You See How Happy We Are? Facebook Images and Relationship Satisfaction

Laura R. Saslow, Amy Muise, Emily A. Impett, Matt Dubin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 22 Citations

Abstract

Love is often thought to involve a merging of identities or a sense that a romantic partner is part of oneself. Couples who report feeling more satisfied with their relationships also feel more interconnected. We hypothesized that Facebook profile photos would provide a novel way to tap into romantic partners' merged identities. In a cross-sectional study (Study 1), a longitudinal study (Study 2), and a 14-day daily experience study (Study 3), we found that individuals who posted dyadic profile pictures on Facebook reported feeling more satisfied with their relationships and closer to their partners than individuals who did not. We also found that on days when people felt more satisfied in their relationship, they were more likely to share relationship-relevant information on Facebook. This study expands our knowledge of how online behavioral traces give us powerful insight into the satisfaction and closeness of important social bonds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-418
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Emotions
Love
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • emotion
  • Internet/cyberpsychology
  • romantic relationships
  • self-presentation
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Can You See How Happy We Are? Facebook Images and Relationship Satisfaction. / Saslow, Laura R.; Muise, Amy; Impett, Emily A.; Dubin, Matt.

In: Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol. 4, No. 4, 07.2013, p. 411-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Saslow, Laura R.; Muise, Amy; Impett, Emily A.; Dubin, Matt / Can You See How Happy We Are? Facebook Images and Relationship Satisfaction.

In: Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol. 4, No. 4, 07.2013, p. 411-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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